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JavaScript / jQuery

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From: ANONYMOUS
Date: Fri 5th Jun, 9:22pm
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Hi Tim
If an exam question asks for JavaScript code, is it acceptable to answer with jQuery? 
Thank you.

JavaScript / jQuery

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From: Timothy F.
Date: Mon 8th Jun, 9:27am
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ANONYMOUS wrote:

> Hi Tim
> If an exam question asks for JavaScript code, is it acceptable to answer with jQuery? 
> Thank you.

Pure javascript is prefered.

JavaScript / jQuery

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From: Nathan S.
Date: Mon 8th Jun, 11:54am
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"Timothy French" <ti*.*r*n*[email protected]*a*e*u*a*> wrote:

> ANONYMOUS wrote:
> 
> > Hi Tim
> > If an exam question asks for JavaScript code, is it acceptable to answer with jQuery? 
> > Thank you.
> 
> Pure javascript is prefered.


Jquery is so much easier to remember for DOM manipulation (eg. .append(); and 
remove()/empty();.  Is there any chance you could quantify the 'prefered' concept?  

Here is a hypothetical question for you:
Say a javascript coding question has 10 marks and part of it involves DOM manipulation, say 4  
of the 10 marks worth.  So I go ahead use jquery anyway;

Are we talking basically any marks for that part of the code are lost?  Or we just get some of 
the 4 marks.  I'd probably trade 2 marks for not having to remember things like: 
element.parentNode.removeChild(element);  Obviously, we will not know the breakdown of marks 
in the exam, but I am trying to get a feel for the aversion to jquery here.   If it is was 
extreme, like, you basically get no marks when you fall back to jquery, then I guess I would 
try to force some of the key JS commands into my head.

Regards,

Nathan

JavaScript / jQuery

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From: Haolin W.
Date: Mon 8th Jun, 6:27pm
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Easy to remember yes, but using a library is not a good approach to answering an exam question 
that's questioning you about JavaScript. What if you don't have the library? The fact of the matter 
is that you need a library to be using the functions that you'd be using for JQuery. If you write 
raw JavaScript, it may be harder to remember (although you have a cheat sheet for it), however you 
will 100% be answering exactly what the question is asking, and can guarantee that it will work 
regardless of whatever imports exist. The example you gave, those functions, I believe that they 
are on the cheat sheet. Avoid using libraries unless explicitly told to in the question.

"Nathan Scott" <18*1*1*[email protected]*u*e*t*u*a*e*u*a*> wrote:

> "Timothy French" <ti*.*r*n*[email protected]*a*e*u*a*> wrote:
> 
> > ANONYMOUS wrote:
> > 
> > > Hi Tim
> > > If an exam question asks for JavaScript code, is it acceptable to answer with jQuery? 
> > > Thank you.
> > 
> > Pure javascript is prefered.
> 
> 
> Jquery is so much easier to remember for DOM manipulation (eg. .append(); and 
> remove()/empty();.  Is there any chance you could quantify the 'prefered' concept?  
> 
> Here is a hypothetical question for you:
> Say a javascript coding question has 10 marks and part of it involves DOM manipulation, say 4  
> of the 10 marks worth.  So I go ahead use jquery anyway;
> 
> Are we talking basically any marks for that part of the code are lost?  Or we just get some of 
> the 4 marks.  I'd probably trade 2 marks for not having to remember things like: 
> element.parentNode.removeChild(element);  Obviously, we will not know the breakdown of marks 
> in the exam, but I am trying to get a feel for the aversion to jquery here.   If it is was 
> extreme, like, you basically get no marks when you fall back to jquery, then I guess I would 
> try to force some of the key JS commands into my head.
> 
> Regards,
> 
> Nathan

JavaScript / jQuery

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From: Nathan S.
Date: Wed 10th Jun, 11:56am
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ok thx..   DO NOT use libraries unless asked to.

Talking about the cheatsheet:

Q: another CITS unit has forbid the use of any notes/paper etc.  What is the policy for Agile?  The 
reason I ask is the cheat sheets.  I would ideally just print them.  I think I made a comment in the 
trial exam on the how I find it hard to use, it closes everytime you go to another question, so you have 
to go fishing for the menu item again.  It also doesn't always allow you to click and drag to enlarge 
the window (I'm on windows 10), which really is a deal breaker for me, I had major issues with this last 
week.  Searching through the cheatsheet when the window for it is stuck at 400x400px is not fun in an 
exam scenario.  From a user perspective it is badly designed.  I suppose we have a little extra time 
with these exams, so that helps to deal with this kind of thing.  However, some direction would be good 
here.  I do somewhat agree with the comp.vision lecturer to ban paper completely as it will make his 
life easier dealing with all the incidents that examsoft will generate everytime someone looks away from 
the screen etc.

"Haolin Wu" <21*0*1*[email protected]*u*e*t*u*a*e*u*a*> wrote:

> Easy to remember yes, but using a library is not a good approach to answering an exam question 
> that's questioning you about JavaScript. What if you don't have the library? The fact of the matter 
> is that you need a library to be using the functions that you'd be using for JQuery. If you write 
> raw JavaScript, it may be harder to remember (although you have a cheat sheet for it), however you 
> will 100% be answering exactly what the question is asking, and can guarantee that it will work 
> regardless of whatever imports exist. The example you gave, those functions, I believe that they 
> are on the cheat sheet. Avoid using libraries unless explicitly told to in the question.
> 
> "Nathan Scott" <18*1*1*[email protected]*u*e*t*u*a*e*u*a*> wrote:
> 
> > "Timothy French" <ti*.*r*n*[email protected]*a*e*u*a*> wrote:
> > 
> > > ANONYMOUS wrote:
> > > 
> > > > Hi Tim
> > > > If an exam question asks for JavaScript code, is it acceptable to answer with jQuery? 
> > > > Thank you.
> > > 
> > > Pure javascript is prefered.
> > 
> > 
> > Jquery is so much easier to remember for DOM manipulation (eg. .append(); and 
> > remove()/empty();.  Is there any chance you could quantify the 'prefered' concept?  
> > 
> > Here is a hypothetical question for you:
> > Say a javascript coding question has 10 marks and part of it involves DOM manipulation, say 4  
> > of the 10 marks worth.  So I go ahead use jquery anyway;
> > 
> > Are we talking basically any marks for that part of the code are lost?  Or we just get some of 
> > the 4 marks.  I'd probably trade 2 marks for not having to remember things like: 
> > element.parentNode.removeChild(element);  Obviously, we will not know the breakdown of marks 
> > in the exam, but I am trying to get a feel for the aversion to jquery here.   If it is was 
> > extreme, like, you basically get no marks when you fall back to jquery, then I guess I would 
> > try to force some of the key JS commands into my head.
> > 
> > Regards,
> > 
> > Nathan

JavaScript / jQuery

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From: Timothy F.
Date: Wed 10th Jun, 12:22pm
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"Nathan Scott" <18*1*1*[email protected]*u*e*t*u*a*e*u*a*> wrote:

> Q: another CITS unit has forbid the use of any notes/paper etc.  What is the policy for Agile?  The 
> reason I ask is the cheat sheets.  I would ideally just print them.  I think I made a comment in the 
> trial exam on the how I find it hard to use, it closes everytime you go to another question, so you have 
> to go fishing for the menu item again.  It also doesn't always allow you to click and drag to enlarge 
> the window (I'm on windows 10), which really is a deal breaker for me, I had major issues with this last 
> week.  Searching through the cheatsheet when the window for it is stuck at 400x400px is not fun in an 
> exam scenario.  From a user perspective it is badly designed.  I suppose we have a little extra time 
> with these exams, so that helps to deal with this kind of thing.  However, some direction would be good 
> here.  I do somewhat agree with the comp.vision lecturer to ban paper completely as it will make his 
> life easier dealing with all the incidents that examsoft will generate everytime someone looks away from 
> the screen etc.
> 

In Agile Web Development, the policy is you can have 5 blank sheets of paper to make notes on during the 
exam. You can't print out the cheat sheet beforehand. I know the pdf viewer function is less than ideal, but 
at least once you've found what your looking for you can scribble a note and then go back to the answer.

JavaScript / jQuery

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From: Georgia A.
Date: Wed 10th Jun, 12:34pm
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"Timothy French" <ti*.*r*n*[email protected]*a*e*u*a*> wrote:

> "Nathan Scott" <18*1*1*[email protected]*u*e*t*u*a*e*u*a*> wrote:
> 
> > Q: another CITS unit has forbid the use of any notes/paper etc.  What is the policy for Agile?  The 
> > reason I ask is the cheat sheets.  I would ideally just print them.  I think I made a comment in the 
> > trial exam on the how I find it hard to use, it closes everytime you go to another question, so you have 
> > to go fishing for the menu item again.  It also doesn't always allow you to click and drag to enlarge 
> > the window (I'm on windows 10), which really is a deal breaker for me, I had major issues with this last 
> > week.  Searching through the cheatsheet when the window for it is stuck at 400x400px is not fun in an 
> > exam scenario.  From a user perspective it is badly designed.  I suppose we have a little extra time 
> > with these exams, so that helps to deal with this kind of thing.  However, some direction would be good 
> > here.  I do somewhat agree with the comp.vision lecturer to ban paper completely as it will make his 
> > life easier dealing with all the incidents that examsoft will generate everytime someone looks away from 
> > the screen etc.
> > 
> 
> In Agile Web Development, the policy is you can have 5 blank sheets of paper to make notes on during the 
> exam. You can't print out the cheat sheet beforehand. I know the pdf viewer function is less than ideal, but 
> at least once you've found what your looking for you can scribble a note and then go back to the answer.


Hi Tim, 

In the exam will we have to use JQuery at all, I am far more comfortable with JS and wanted to know if I can answer 
all questions just using JS instead of JQuery.

Thank you!

JavaScript / jQuery

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From: Haolin W.
Date: Wed 10th Jun, 2:17pm
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Hi Georgia.

A good rule of thumb is that you should be using raw JavaScript unless explicitly told to otherwise, please see an 
earlier comment that I made before about why using JQuery is less than ideal. Good to see that you are way more 
comfortable with raw JS, that is what we will expect you to write for JavaScript questions.

"Georgia Anderson" <22*3*8*[email protected]*u*e*t*u*a*e*u*a*> wrote:

> "Timothy French" <ti*.*r*n*[email protected]*a*e*u*a*> wrote:
> 
> > "Nathan Scott" <18*1*1*[email protected]*u*e*t*u*a*e*u*a*> wrote:
> > 
> > > Q: another CITS unit has forbid the use of any notes/paper etc.  What is the policy for Agile?  The 
> > > reason I ask is the cheat sheets.  I would ideally just print them.  I think I made a comment in the 
> > > trial exam on the how I find it hard to use, it closes everytime you go to another question, so you have 
> > > to go fishing for the menu item again.  It also doesn't always allow you to click and drag to enlarge 
> > > the window (I'm on windows 10), which really is a deal breaker for me, I had major issues with this last 
> > > week.  Searching through the cheatsheet when the window for it is stuck at 400x400px is not fun in an 
> > > exam scenario.  From a user perspective it is badly designed.  I suppose we have a little extra time 
> > > with these exams, so that helps to deal with this kind of thing.  However, some direction would be good 
> > > here.  I do somewhat agree with the comp.vision lecturer to ban paper completely as it will make his 
> > > life easier dealing with all the incidents that examsoft will generate everytime someone looks away from 
> > > the screen etc.
> > > 
> > 
> > In Agile Web Development, the policy is you can have 5 blank sheets of paper to make notes on during the 
> > exam. You can't print out the cheat sheet beforehand. I know the pdf viewer function is less than ideal, but 
> > at least once you've found what your looking for you can scribble a note and then go back to the answer.
> 
> 
> Hi Tim, 
> 
> In the exam will we have to use JQuery at all, I am far more comfortable with JS and wanted to know if I can answer 
> all questions just using JS instead of JQuery.
> 
> Thank you!

JavaScript / jQuery

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From: Timothy F.
Date: Wed 10th Jun, 2:40pm
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"Georgia Anderson" <22*3*8*[email protected]*u*e*t*u*a*e*u*a*> wrote:

> 
> Hi Tim, 
> 
> In the exam will we have to use JQuery at all, I am far more comfortable with JS and wanted to know if I can answer 
> all questions just using JS instead of JQuery.
> 
> Thank you!

Sure, unless the question specifically asks for JQuery (in that case a pure JS answer would get part marks).

JavaScript / jQuery

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From: Nathan S.
Date: Wed 10th Jun, 3:00pm
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ok thx, 5 plain sheets.
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