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From: James H.
Date: Tue 27th Jul 2021, 11:21am
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I have never coded with the C language what program/application would you recommended 
to code with? 

Program

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From: Christopher M.
Date: Tue 27th Jul 2021, 12:00pm
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"James Hill" <23*9*5*[email protected]*u*e*t*u*a*e*u*a*> wrote:

> I have never coded with the C language what program/application would you recommended 
> to code with? 

Hello James,

You're in the same situation as (guessing) about 90% of students in this unit - have some 
programming experience in other languages at an introductory level, such as Java or Python, but 
no prior experience in C.

So on that point you have nothing to fear, and you'll be learning new material at the same pace 
as your peers.

We're using the Friday workshops to introduce the software used in the unit, and to develop 
examples in the workshop (an activity termed 'live coding').  In this Friday's workshop we'll be 
answering your question, and others, and those from other students.  It'll be a wall of new 
knowledge, at first.

There's no single or simple answer to your question, but we'll be aiming to get all students to 
use (similar) variants of the same Linux operating-system, and using a program termed a compiler 
to convert human-readable C code into executable machine code.

Before Friday's workshop we'll be preparing and releasing some notes and URLs to help you get 
started.

See you on Friday,

Program

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From: Amitava D.
Date: Tue 27th Jul 2021, 1:12pm
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"James Hill" <23*9*5*[email protected]*u*e*t*u*a*e*u*a*> wrote:

> I have never coded with the C language what program/application would you recommended 
> to code with? 

As Chris has written, he will show you the basics this Friday. I would
just add that we need almost nothing except a C compiler and a text
editor. You have to type the C program in the text editor, save it with
a .c extension, and then use the gcc compiler to compile it. The compiler
will produce an executable file(it is called a.out by default in a linux
system), but you can give it another name using compiler options. You
have to then type the name of the executable and press the 'enter'
key to run it.

There are of course IDEs (Integrated Development Environment) for writing
and compiling C code, but we don't need anything more than what I have
described above.

Program

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From: ANONYMOUS
Date: Tue 27th Jul 2021, 8:40pm
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"Christopher McDonald" <ch*i*.*c*o*a*[email protected]*a*e*u*a*> wrote:

> There's no single or simple answer to your question, but we'll be aiming to get all students to 
> use (similar) variants of the same Linux operating-system, and using a program termed a compiler 
> to convert human-readable C code into executable machine code.
> 

Interesting. Could I use OSX for the unit like previous semesters? I am not sure I can install linux with 
my T2 chip. 

Program

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From: Amitava D.
Date: Wed 28th Jul 2021, 9:10am
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ANONYMOUS wrote:

> "Christopher McDonald" <ch*i*.*c*o*a*[email protected]*a*e*u*a*> wrote:
> 
> > There's no single or simple answer to your question, but we'll be aiming to get all students to 
> > use (similar) variants of the same Linux operating-system, and using a program termed a compiler 
> > to convert human-readable C code into executable machine code.
> > 
> 
> Interesting. Could I use OSX for the unit like previous semesters? I am not sure I can install linux with 
> my T2 chip. 
Yes, you can run the gcc compiler in OSX.

Program

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From: Christopher M.
Date: Wed 28th Jul 2021, 11:24am
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ANONYMOUS wrote:

> Interesting. Could I use OSX for the unit like previous semesters? I am not sure I can install linux with 
> my T2 chip.

(this is pre-empting some of the discussion we'll have in Friday's workshop)

There are 3 main contemporary operating systems used by our students - Windows, Linux, and macOS.  Remembering that this 
unit is not just about the (very portable) C programming language, and is also about the programming-language/OS 
interface, it is essential that as many students as possible have the opportunity to use the platform on which the 
teaching materials will focus.

[[Historic note - For a couple of years, this unit has required that all projects be marked on a Linux system, and not 
simply any system of students' choosing.  This improves fairness and repeatability in the marking process.  Until 2018, 
the Dept had a laboratory of Apple iMac computers, and all students' projects were marked on those computers. But due to 
the rising costs on Apple computers (perhaps resulting in decreased student ownership), the university now provides a 
recent version of the Linux operating system on lab computers in CSSE.  Last year was quite a nightmare for project 
markers and students alike, as access to the common Linux lab distribution was unavailable when the campus was locked-
down, and attempting to determine on which platform students developed their project created many headaches.]]

Knowing that students own a mix of Windows, Linux, and macOS, we're providing documentation to explain the options, the 
best of which (we believe) is to run the Ubuntu distribution of Linux on any of the 3 platforms. Unfortunately, the Linux 
distribution installed in CSSE Lab 2.03 is not Ubuntu, and its licensing prevents us from providing a copy to students.  
However, we're aware of the relevant differences between the lab installation and Ubuntu.  The chosen option is suitable 
for Windows-10 users, macOS users (on Intel or Apple Silicon, with or without the T2 chip), and doesn't require 
repartitioning your disk.

So, while students will be able to attempt most of the laboratory and project exercises on other platforms, such as macOS 
or Windows, all students are STRONGLY encouraged to become sufficiently familiar with Linux to undertake the laboratory 
and project exercises, and to test the projects ON the Linux platform before they're submitted.

More details provided in Friday's workshop.

Program

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From: Amitava D.
Date: Wed 28th Jul 2021, 6:39pm
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"Christopher McDonald" <ch*i*.*c*o*a*[email protected]*a*e*u*a*> wrote:

> ANONYMOUS wrote:
> 
> > Interesting. Could I use OSX for the unit like previous semesters? I am not sure I can install linux with 
> > my T2 chip.
> 
> (this is pre-empting some of the discussion we'll have in Friday's workshop)
> 
> There are 3 main contemporary operating systems used by our students - Windows, Linux, and macOS.  Remembering that this 
> unit is not just about the (very portable) C programming language, and is also about the programming-language/OS 
> interface, it is essential that as many students as possible have the opportunity to use the platform on which the 
> teaching materials will focus.
> 
> [[Historic note - For a couple of years, this unit has required that all projects be marked on a Linux system, and not 
> simply any system of students' choosing.  This improves fairness and repeatability in the marking process.  Until 2018, 
> the Dept had a laboratory of Apple iMac computers, and all students' projects were marked on those computers. But due to 
> the rising costs on Apple computers (perhaps resulting in decreased student ownership), the university now provides a 
> recent version of the Linux operating system on lab computers in CSSE.  Last year was quite a nightmare for project 
> markers and students alike, as access to the common Linux lab distribution was unavailable when the campus was locked-
> down, and attempting to determine on which platform students developed their project created many headaches.]]
> 
> Knowing that students own a mix of Windows, Linux, and macOS, we're providing documentation to explain the options, the 
> best of which (we believe) is to run the Ubuntu distribution of Linux on any of the 3 platforms. Unfortunately, the Linux 
> distribution installed in CSSE Lab 2.03 is not Ubuntu, and its licensing prevents us from providing a copy to students.  
> However, we're aware of the relevant differences between the lab installation and Ubuntu.  The chosen option is suitable 
> for Windows-10 users, macOS users (on Intel or Apple Silicon, with or without the T2 chip), and doesn't require 
> repartitioning your disk.
> 
> So, while students will be able to attempt most of the laboratory and project exercises on other platforms, such as macOS 
> or Windows, all students are STRONGLY encouraged to become sufficiently familiar with Linux to undertake the laboratory 
> and project exercises, and to test the projects ON the Linux platform before they're submitted.
> 
> More details provided in Friday's workshop.

Thanks Chris for the clarification. 
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Last modified:  6:26am Aug 12 2021